Index

Below is a list of all my blog posts in alphabetical order (excluding ‘the’, ‘a’, etc). The posts are updated regularly with new research and resources:

An actively managed placental birth might be the best option for most women

The Anterior Cervical Lip: how to ruin a perfectly good birth

Amniotic Fluid Volume: too much, too little, or who knows?

The Assessment of Progress

Asynclitism: a well aligned baby or a tilted head?

Birth from the Baby’s Perspective

In Celebration of the OP Baby

Childbirth Trauma: care provider actions and interactions

Cord Blood Collection: confessions of a vampire-midwife

The Curse of Meconium Stained Liquor

In Defence of the Amniotic Sac

Early Labour and Mixed Messages

The Effective Labour Contraction

Feel the Fear and Birth Anyway

The Future of Midwifery and Homebirth in Australia

Guest post: when birth is trauma

The Human Microbiome: considerations for pregnancy, birth and early mothering

Induction: a step by step guide

Induction: balancing the risks

Information Giving and the Law

Judging Birth

Listening to Baby During Labour

Midwifery Practice During Birth: rites of passage and rites of protection

Nuchal Cords: the perfect scapegoat

Perineal Protectors?

The Placenta: essential resuscitation equipment

Pre-labour Rupture of Membranes: impatience and risk

Pushing: leave it to the experts

Responsibilities in the mother-midwife relationship

Shoulder Dystocia: the real story

Stages of Labour and Collusion

Supporting women’s instinctive behaviour during birth

Testing, Testing…

Understanding and assessing labour progress

Vaginal Examinations: a symptom of a cervical-centric birth culture

VBAC: making a mountain out of a molehill

12 Responses to Index

  1. Kay says:

    I have enjoyed my first blog and look forward to reading more. X

  2. Gus says:

    Hello Dr Reed. Thank you for such an exhaustive website of info. My wife ( and I ) are considering a vba6c and in my researching came across your website. We have a midwife friend who is walking with us on this very uncertain road. My wife is 37 weeks. Do you have more info that I can read up on re vba6c? Kind regards, Gus

    • Hi Gus – There are so few women having a VBAC after multiple c-sections that there is no research. I think your best bet is searching Facebook for community VBAC groups. You will probably find women in them with experience and resources they can share. Good luck! 🙂

  3. rosaffm says:

    Hi Rachel

    I am considering a vbac with twins. I read your vbac article and found it really interesting – especially the part about benefits of going into labour even if ultimately planning a c section. My biggest fear is cord prolapse of second baby. Can you please recommend research I could read about this ? And also about uterine rupture with twins, is the risk greater with multiples?
    Birthing in new Zealand.

    • Twin VBACs are rare therefore there is no research in this area. Theoretically there possibly would be an increased risk of uterine rupture with twins because the uterus is more stretched out. In terms of cord prolapse – this is a concern for twin 2. I am not aware of any specific research – only clinician experiences and consensus that it is something to look out for. However, the chance of this happening will depend on many individual factors that you and your care provider can assess as the birth becomes closer and during labour eg. position of the babies. It would be great if you could come back and update us after your birth. 🙂

      • rosaffm says:

        Thanks, Rachel. I guess I’m wary of discussing cord prolapse only with obstetricians as I’m assuming they’ll focus on this risk and not risks of c section as they tend to be more medicalised than midwives. Do you know why twin vbacs are so rare? Because of fear? I guess it’s catch 22 and the research can’t be collated if women aren’t doing it. But are women not doing it because of misinformed fear? Hmmm. Could you please be more specific about how cord prolapse could be preempted and therefore prevented? I’ve been told so far position of second twin is fairly meaningless until first twin has been delivered. Could you also elaborate a little on benefits of labour even if planning a section? Can the hormones help with milk coming on earlier? I had a five day wait with my last one and i had experienced a very long labour before it. …so hormones didn’t seem to help with that side of things. ..

        • Yes it is a catch 22. Women are probably not doing it because care providers recommend a c-section and may not have the skills (beliefs) required to support a physiological twin birth. They are rare events. I have only seen a handful myself. A cord prolapse cannot be pre-empted or prevented (if it is going to happen) but some factors make it more likely eg. ‘high’ unfixed fetal head, amount of amniotic fluid, how/when the membranes break… if there are more than one amniotic sac, the position the second twin gets into after twin one is out… and on and on. This is why you need to discuss these risks and management with your care providers. And position of 2nd twin is not ‘meaningless’ before birth of first… a head down twin who is not ‘locked’ has less chance of suddenly turning transverse of breech than an already transverse baby. To be honest cord prolapse is not a huge concern for twins… there are others such as placental abruption that are more common.

          The benefits of labour are complex too. The baby initiates labour, there are a cocktail of hormones released during labour that facilitate not only birth but the early bonding and initiation of breastfeeding. Immediate and prolonged contact (skin to skin) with the baby/ies after birth also facilitate the release of these hormones (oxytocin and prolactin). Sarah Buckley has some great resources re. hormones if you want to search for her online.

          • rosaffm says:

            Thanks so much for taking the time to respond. Much appreciated. Will check Sarah Buckley out. Will try to post back after birth but depends entirely on how much time I have. Which I’m assuming won’t be much 😉

  4. joy Horner says:

    Thank you for your work. Ive only seen 2 true shoulder dystocias in my 15 years ptactice. The movie link at the end of your article appears to be broken. Try this https://m.youtube.com/watch?sts=17170&v=CRUypStm2pE&oref=https%3A%2F%2Faccounts.google.com%2FAccountLoginInfo&has_verified=1&client=mv-google&layout=mobile

  5. Florence says:

    Hello Dr Reed. Thank you for such an exhaustive website of info. I’ve found your articles translated in french. They’re still available ?.

    • I have closed the midwifethinking French blogsite because I was unable to keep the articles updated. I regularly update articles with new research and information to ensure they are current. It is a big job and I don’t have (or expect to have) a French translator to consistently work on the French versions. However, some of the article are available on other people’s French blogs (with permission). If you search for a post in French you may find a version. 🙂

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